UPDATE 17/11/17

Update
I am about to order the Karki caps with the RTFV 35Sqn logo on the front it will be a few weeks before those who had ordered them before you receive them
I have just spent four nights in the hospital the had a drip on a drip I have to have a drip every six hours, I contacted CELLULITIS It is a Bactericidal skin infection I was on a cruise to PNG I had a little nick on my left arm it bleed and that how I got the infection? My left arm swelled to Popeye size very red I am on the mend now
Raffle will close on Sunday 29/11/17 and be drawn Monday 27/11/17 last chance to get tickets
Members
We have 300 members now and new members are joining anyone who served with WALLAby AIRLINES should join we also have many more emails that receive our emails
Newsletter Update
I am putting together a newsletter if anyone has something to contribute send it to me asap
Cheers Sambo

Barry Redshaw Funneral

8 November 2017

Barry Redshaw – Served in Wallaby Airlines in 1967-68 as an airframe fitter.
He was a member of our Association since March 1999. Barry’s funeral details are as follows:
Sylvan Funerals, 22 Warwick Road, Ipswich at 11:00 a.m. Monday 13 November 2017. I will be attending, and I will lay a wreath on behalf of the Association. I will also take our banner as well.
Sambo

9 Oct 1999 – 38SQN and 35SQN deploy to East Timor

9 Oct 1999 – 38SQN and 35SQN deploy to East Timor

On this day in 1999, members of 38SQN and 35SQN deployed to Dili, East Timor as part of INTERFET. A dozen technicians and an Army Ground Liaison Officer travelled from Darwin to Dili on a RAAF C130. Two Caribous were flown from Darwin to Dili the next day (10 Oct) and flying ops in the country commenced on 12 Oct.

In the month leading up to the deployment, Caribou flights from Darwin to East Timor had occurred. These supported SF operations and repatriated some East Timorese who had previously fled the country. None of these earlier Caribou flights remained overnight or refuelled in East Timor and crews were faced with the prospect of insufficient fuel to make land in the event of an engine failure for a period of the return journey.

Once deployed to East Timor, Caribou operations occurred as “86 Wing, Detachment C” and were initially based in Dili, living and working from tents next to the busy runway. The Detachment later moved to Bacau and increased in size to four aircraft. At Bacau most aircrew lived in a converted bathroom, while the technicians lived in a building that should have been condemned. The Detachment finally moved backed to Dili and living conditions improved when air conditioned ATCO huts were provided. All 35SQN personnel were transferred to 38SQN in 2000 and the last 38SQN Caribou left East Timor on 25 Feb 2001.

The Caribou proved ideal at operating in the mountainous tropical island nation, to rudimentary airfields, and achieved a high rate of mission success. At times the Caribou was the only link between Dili and the south of the island when rain cut roads, washed out beach landings and prevented helicopters from flying due to cloud cover across the high terrain. Tactical, fixed-wing transport again proved its worth, carrying out the unglamorous but vital tasks.

Maliana Airfield, East Timor

history-maliana-air-field-east-timor
Maliana Air Field – East Timor

Barry Redshaw

Sad News 7/11/17
I have just had a call from Fred Axtell advising me that Barry Renshaw has passed away
Barry was 78years old he had Liver Cancer. He was diagnosed. In August this year
Fred will advise when the funeral details are Finalized
Sambo

Important Please Check Your Membership

Hi Everyone,

Please have a look at this list below and check if your membership is correct, as there have been some issues with types of memberships and the payments that have not yet been received. Make sure you have registered your membership online: please contact us if there is any problems or questions.

Kind Regards,

RTFV-35SQN

 

Check the list directly here:

Check your membership here

Or The list can be found again on this page:

Documents of Interest